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Owner-ops rail against EOBRs; CTA wants them in Canada

OTTAWA – Although Canadian transport officials got the early jump on a universal electronic on-board recorder (EOBR) mandate, the Canadian Trucking Alliance is hoping regulators here don't fall far behind the Americans in launching a rule that covers the trucking industry.

The US Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released this week its long-awaited, "broader" EOBR proposal and relaxed record keeping requirements for EOBR carriers.

On this side of the border, a government working group reporting to the Council of Deputy Ministers Responsible for Transportation and Highway Safety is charged with developing Canada’s EOBR rules.

Indications are that the regulators are working on a proposal that covers most commercial operators who currently keep paper logs.

The CTA has for several years supported the introduction of a broad EOBR mandate -- subject to certain conditions – in order to create a level playing field in terms of hours-of-service compliance.

However, with the release of the U.S. proposal, CTA chief David Bradley says "work will clearly have to be accelerated in Canada."

"There are many important issues yet to be resolved, not the least of which is the all-important enforcement policies that will accompany an EOBR rule in the US and in Canada. If we are going to build a new sidewalk, we need to build it where people are going to walk."

Meanwhile, the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association responded to the U.S, proposal by calling EOBRs "nothing more than over-priced record keepers."

"This proposal is actually another example of the administration’s determination to wipe out small businesses by continuing to crank out overly burdensome regulations that simply run up costs," said Todd Spencer, Executive Vice President of OOIDA.

OOIDA contends that EOBRs cannot accurately and automatically record a driver’s hours of service and duty status.

They can only track the movement and location of a truck and require human interaction to record any change of duty status.

"Therefore, such as in the case of loading and unloading time, the device is incapable of determining the actual duty status of drivers without interaction from drivers indicating to the device that they are on-duty."

OOIDA, which has launched a petition to defeat the proposal, also claims that the government ignored a federal statute to ensure that EOBRs "will not be used (by employers and highway enforcement) to harass vehicle operators."

"Companies can and do use technology to harass drivers by interrupting rest periods," Spencer explains in a press release.

"They can contact the driver and put on pressure to get back on the road to get the most out of his or her on-duty time. This mandate would be a step backward in the effort to make highways safer."  

 
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louisp1374

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THIS week I was onduty for 8 hours ran into a hiway accident that just happened on I59 in Alabama..Sat for another 9 hours on the hiway this was inforseable,I was way over my 14 then told to roll to the next safe stop 1/1.2 hours away how would I be penalized buy fmcsa,for sutch a thing that was out of my controll ...an airline pilot runs out of hours in a holding patern inflight to land they don't penalize the pilot or the airline ,but we go past that 14 on,11drive a bit an lookout your nailed ,,fix this first give us leeway,an then let's talk eobr

Anonymous

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i feel that i live in the USA for a reason,to enjoy the freedom that my for fathers fought and died for. I ll be damned if I am going to fight the war again that was already won. With that being said all the special intrest groups need to stop wasting my time and money and enjoy the freedom that we all take for granite. Thank you OOIDA for all the great work you are doing. Denis Jenkins II

harleytrucker21

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something to think about this week i became terribal sick in fl. and i live in il. so as an owner-op every damn time some eobr would say i could go guess what happens since im not a robot im lost on a computer so you care to talk call 2174743032

BRAD BROWN

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The EOBR,s will help the trucking industry at all , it will hender every thing . It could bring the country to halt . The Cattle haulers will be greatly affected ,because they supply the meat for the us consumers . Drivers would quit on a national level . COMPANIES WILL LOOSE MAJOR AMOUNT MONEY AND DRIVERS . RUNNING OVER HOURS WILL NEVER STOP . EOBR,S IS A COMPLETE WAY CONTROL THIS INDUSTRY , BUT THE RIGHT OF A FREE MAN AN FREE COUNTRY WILL BE GONE . THIS IS THE LAND OF FREE . THERE ARE SO MUCH ABOUT THIS TRUCKING INDUSTRY THAT GOVERNMENT AGENCIES DO NOT UNDERSTAND . EOBR,S WILL COST TO MUCH IN THIS WEAKEND US DOLLAR AN LOOSE US JOBS THAT OVER SEAS . THE AMERICAN PEOPLE DO NOT DESIRE THIS KIND OF TREATMENT , I,M AN AMERICAN AN I WILL NOT STAND FOR THIS .

Anonymous

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It is time the law makers back out of our lives. Focus on education and punishment for bad driving decisions. Additonal rules and electronics still do not make up for bad decision making. You drive tired and cause an accident, then go after that.

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