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Prince Albert Mayor Threatens Truck Ban

PRINCE ALBERT, SK— Unless trucks transporting dangerous goods give Prince Albert mayor a list of what they’re carrying, they will simply not be allowed to cross through the city.

Mayor Greg Dionne told the CBC he’s threatening to ban the transport of dangerous goods through the city in order to protect the people.

"It's a far out option, but it is an option that we have," Dionne says. "We don't want to use it, but at the same time we need to know what is coming through our community for the safety of our community."

If trucks supply a list of what they’re carrying, as he’s been requesting for the past nine months, first responders will be better equipped to handle the situation in case of any incidents.

But the city’s firefighters say they’re well equipped to handle any incidents involving dangerous goods, according to the Prince Albert Daily Herald. 

“We’re not flying blind in the city,” says deputy chief, Jason Everitt. “Our staff is very well trained in managing dangerous goods.”

And while they currently don’t have a list of what’s running through the city, they have an idea based on the calls they’ve responded to in the past.

“Most of those [calls] are small-scale spills where there’s a car accident where we’ve got diesel or gasoline leaking,” he says.

He adds that they also communicate with dispatchers and do an evaluate upon arrival at the scene, so they quickly know what the situation is and what substances are involved.

And there’s truck placards, too, of course.

The truck ban is a last resort, Dionne says, but it’s within their right to implement it, he says.

"I've heard from our local MLAs," Dionne says. "Of course, they don't like controversy."

"Unfortunately you sometimes have to use controversy to get the will, you know, to protect your people."

Unlike Saskatoon and Regina, Prince Albert does not have a Circle Drive or Ring Road to allow trucks to go around the city.

For more on this story, you can read the CBC article here and the Prince Albert’s Daily Herald here

 
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Filed Under: trucking saskatchewan truck ban transporting dangerous goods
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Just a Trucker

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What is wrong with this man? When the hospitals run out of Oxygen, or the gas stations are out of gas, the store shelves are empty then what? Seems somewhat ironic that the fire department knows what to do and how to do it but for some reason the mayor wants a list so he can see whats comming in? Whats next they stop you at the city limits and ask for your papers? The dangerous good act covers all of that with the regulations and placard requirements. If its for off route permission I could understand somewhat, but when they are traveling through on the provincial highway? Really? If you re that worried MR Mayor perhaps offer a ring road around the city funded by YOUR OWN tax base.

Anonymous

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Just build a road around it, I will give them some very need employment and stimulant for city. If SK will put all the truck taxes into road building we wild not have this conversation. Can someone finly get all province's to spend road and fuel taxes on roads

J FINN

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Two or three days of no trucks with dangerous goods delivering in Prince Albert would show this mayor just how little importance his tantrum really has. He would be begging for trucks with dangerous goods to come into town or he would get lynched by furious citizens with no gas, no propane, and increasingly empty store shelves.

Anonymous

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Some of the most dangerous loads on the road move under "consumer commodity" designation. Think about everything in your average Canadian Tire or any other retail store all put on a trailer together and then add fire. Lots of aerosols, paint and plenty of rubber and plastic to fuel the fire and generate toxic fumes and not a stitch of TDG paperwork required. Get your heads out of your collective butts, these incidents are rare and emergency personnel are well trained to handle most mishaps.

Anonymous

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Has Ford been sharing the crack with other mayors again?

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