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Revised HOS Rule Released

WASHINGTON — The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) released the revised hour-of-service (HOS) rules today.

The new rule reduces the maximum number of hours a truck driver can work within a week by 12 hours. Under the previous rule, drivers could work up to 82 hours within a seven day period — that's now been limited to 70 hours.

Truck drivers also now cannot drive after working eight hours without first taking a break of at least 30 minutes. Drivers, the FMCSA said, can take the 30-minute break whenever they need to during the eight-hour window.

The daily driving limit of 11 hours has been retained, but the FMCSA said it will continue to examine if there are any risks associated with the 11 hour driving time.

The revised rule also requires that drivers who maximize their weekly work hours to take at least two-nights' rest when their 24-hour body clock demands sleep the most — from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.

"This rest requirement is part of the rule's "34-hour restart" provision that allows drivers to restart the clock on their work week by taking at least 34 consecutive hours off-duty," FMCSA stated in a press release. "The final rule allows drivers to use the restart provision only once during a seven-day period."

Commercial truck drivers and companies must comply with the HOS final rule by July 1, 2013. The rule is being sent to the Federal Register today.

Todaystrucking.com will have industry reactions as they develop.

For more on the rule, check out the FMCSA's website here.
 

 
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The Road-Scholar

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With all due respect, Mr. Editor, the US HoS Regulations never allowed being on-duty up to 82 hours within 7 days!!! The 70/8-cycle (70 on-duty hours in 8 days)has always mandated for a driver to take a full 24 hours off-duty at or shortly before reaching 70 on-duty hours in the past 8 days. So, the new regs do not change in that respect. Moreover, your wording regarding the 34-hour Reset is misleading. The only time, when the new regs will mandate two consecutive "1am to 5am" rest periods is when a driver avails him/herself of the optional Reset. (read: optional...the reset is an option, not mandated). At the present, a driver can Reset as many times as he/she wishes, without restrictions as to what time-period of the day/night these 34 hours include. However, the new regs will limit a Reset to ONCE in an 8 day period only. Given that it will also require the two consecutive 'edged in stone' 1am to 5am periods, this will mean that most drivers will require anywhere up to 52 consecutive hours off-duty in order to satisfy these requirements....and, this will cause huge scheduling problems for motor carriers. One other important, but positive, amendment to the regs which you failed to mention is that a driver who is parked (for example waiting to be loaded), can now consider & record this time to be off-duty. This is an improvement, because under the current rule, if a driver has 'responsibility of the motor vehicle' he/she can not be considered 'off-duty'. To 'Anonymous' below: The 30 minute break within the first 8 on-duty hours is to be considered "off-duty", i.e. recorded either on Lines 1 or 2 of your log-grid.

Anonymous

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This just makes me sick to my stomach. ridiculous control “Truck drivers also now cannot drive after working eight hours without first taking a break of at least 30 minutes. Drivers, the FMCSA said, can take the 30-minute break whenever they need to during the eight-hour window.” What kind of break are we talking about, on duty not driving? or off duty. The revised rule also requires that drivers who maximize their weekly work hours to take at least two-nights' rest when their 24-hour body clock demands sleep the most — from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. I take my rest the way I need them no one is telling me to do when and how, it is just so bulling gerda

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